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Compressor clutch failure

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  • #16
    ? York ? Do you mean the one that looks like a lawnmower engine? RV-2 or what? Noisy suckers but worked! The clone game is wrecking the world. Your rig is beyond "truck" is automotive throw away junk, brackets and all, real high grade steel reinforced up to designed to absorb vibrations or shake and cause harm even the engines they bolted to assorted other things.

    Back when I searched (ticks off my anti-virus protection to do it!!) the A-6 stuff was all alloy junk just made to bolt on but you know it's not the real stuff.

    IDK - I just feel your pain with this......

    Tom
    MetroWest, Boston

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    • #17

      The York/CCI is the old Ford/AMC compressor, the replacement for the A-6 Is a modern Aluminum axial compressor with an "extended nose" to mimic the A-6 mount and a common "GM Pad" rear cover. I don't know who makes the main body, if it is Denso, Sanden, Seltec or someone else.
      replcacement for A-6
      Attached Files
      Last edited by Cornbinder89; 3 weeks ago.

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      • #18
        Late to comment. Looks too aluminum/alloy to last forever. For a car I could see it not for what you would use IMO you'll be back at that again. I might try (never have) add a filter so you save the rest of the system,
        Tom
        MetroWest, Boston

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        • #19
          Remember this was a clutch failure not a compressor failure, no indication of a problem with the compressor. A-6's have a fine mesh screen in the suction port to catch any debris, along with a parallel flow condenser, it think it would stop any "chunks" if they ever did happen.
          I've been waiting for the new clutch and it hasn't shown up yet, I may have to get my credit card company involved, as the phone number goes to voice mail and he hasn't returned E mail. This is from a company that has a website and seams to deal in replacement tractor parts.
          I ordered a rebulit clutch (Murry brand) from E bay and which ever shows up 1st will go on. I also ordered a rebuilt drive plate, so if neither clutch looks good or arrives, I can fit my 6 3/4" pulley. it would slow the compressor a bit, but think that would only be an issue at idle.
          My take on line filters is this: If you have metal in the system, you need to get it out, I could see putting a filter ahead of the suction port, and may be the Tx valve if you had a bad failure, and cleaned (flushed) as best you can but want to be sure no crap ruins something else. A high pressure cut-off at the compressors would then be mandatory. Still, I think it would be making the best of a bod situation .
          I think I may have screwed up. When I rebuilt the system a year ago, and 1st started with the OEM condenser, I burst a high pressure hose (old OEM, hose) and expelled all the refrigerant along with a bunch of oil. I replace the hose and condenser, and made a best guess as to how much oil to add and went back with that. I had planned to check the oil after the system had run, but had other problems with the truck, and don't remember doing so. I checked it yesterday and found the level high, and drained back to the level plug. I suppose the extra oil could have caused start-up resistance leading to clutch problems. Live and learn, or at least teach myself to write down what I mean to get done so I don't forget. Hard to ruin a compressor with a little too much oil, I suppose you could hydro-lock if you had way too much, even then it would be the clutch that would take the worse beating.

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          • #20
            "Little too much oil"
            Did that on one of my own is a good thing, for another I'd be ticked and fix that. It worked till the frame fell off the car (way too common to play Fred Flintstone with rusted everything) but sloshed (had to be that) in the condenser still tube and fin converted was guessing but cooled fine just on a hard turn would go warmer for a bit then straighten out so no big deal it worked!

            Tom
            MetroWest, Boston

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            • #21
              Ahh, the good old days when compressors had service valves on top, you could shut the suction, run the compressor for a few sec to pump the refrigerant out and shut the high side, then pull the plug and insert a dipstick to check the oil, then evacuate only the compressor and open the valves!
              My Marmon was set up that way, and being a 1992 was the last system I have seen with that as an option.
              The A-6 has a plug on the side of the crankcase, and with the compressor level, you can crack the plug and roll the compressor side to side to get an indication of what the oil level is. I think there is a dipstick made for one model of the Sanden or some other brand, I'm not sure, but most all today is: remove, drain, refill, as the only way to tell if it is right.
              I've always wondered what the rational for making the oil soluble in the refrigerant was? Why not use oil control rings on the piston and keep it in the crankcase? Cooling of the oil? or may be even with oil rings, some would make it into the refrigerant, so they wanted it to be fully compatible and circulate with the refrigerant?
              Anyway you look at it you have to work hard to kill a compressor with too much oil, easy to do with too little.

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              • #22
                You could choke on oil trying to compress it otherwise wild guess is 25% off either way wouldn't show up. Like you said, you can't tell should be as you said not running thru the system IMO why? Not my job.

                I question if oil is actually soluble in liquid charge or how much we know some is. If a system was made of glass you could see it really do its thing. IDK why they make PAG hygroscopic (sp?) water absorbing either? Super early 134a at all was only the same system pre-retrofitted on lots of stuff did move sight glass which most had now a bummer they gave that up.

                There's been the drift away from being able to really service anything for ages - don't get me going you'll hear the screaming for the 1,000 miles we are probably apart. OMG, I own a 1948 Deere "M" is mostly a GM block but oil cups on even the starter motor! Still runs fine can't use it till I can get a wheel fixed - laugh - it's way to heavy for me to take off it would kill me just leaning over when undone!
                Tom
                MetroWest, Boston

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                • #23
                  Got the reman clutch out of AZ. Still haven heard or seen anything from the guy I ordered from in Iowa. Turns out the clutch coil took a beating and had the wrong snap-ring holding it in, It has three protruding pins that are supposed to mate to the front of the compressor, These had hammered back and forth and the coil was loose. I grabbed another coil from my parts pile and got the correct snap ring.
                  Got it all installed and it works, the temp is in the 40's so too cold to make much more of an assessment.
                  I'm going to assemble the old clutch on a damaged compressor that lost a thrust washer, if I ever have to turn in for a core, someone is going to get all my bad parts!. Core is a core as long as it is complete!
                  It is why if I can buy a used compressor off the .net for around $100 delivered to my door, I grab it as long as the clutch looks useable.

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                  • #24
                    Why so long for a local part? Is your "scrap" one good enough to just leave it and carry on now? I know the temps isn't cooperating I can't know either at that and have NOT started down ones at all yet still cools off way too much.

                    Yes on the core. A core should be a core not a clue what they want for those now or place by place what you get? Shocking is I could have dozens of them, real ones for dirt seems not all that long ago nobody really cared now all those older vehicles are gone got paid with the "clunker" squish deal more than scrap value of metal wipe out the vin# never to return or something like that? Gave me a fortune for two heaps was surprised but a little while ago think metal value lost it's luster for a while,

                    Tom
                    MetroWest, Boston

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                    • #25
                      I don't know what is going on with Superior Tractor, but I will never use them again. I just hope I don't get a bill. Ordered with a CC so I should get protected through them.
                      Nothing wrong with the compressor on the truck, and I didn't want to pull down the system, so just replaced the whole clutch in place.
                      The Clutch I got was NOS rebuild, looks like it has been sitting on the shelf for 20 years or more, but turns and went on without a problem.
                      When I 1st put it on with the old coil it rubbed that was I noticed the coil was loose on the compressor, The wrong snap ring was used to hold it on, and wasn't fully seated in the groove.
                      New (used) coil and a new snap ring and everything is as it should be.

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                      • #26
                        That old NOS clutch may be better than new? Snap rings? Totally wrong or is this one like many "directional" as in one edge is sharp, other side not can fall out if the wrong way? Seems like you've got that pretty well fixed and just test its performance when warm enough.

                        I still don't and never will get it how some of this stuff on the rigs do just endless mile and time just has to be the best quality there is right down to hair pulling poor quality of bearing anything the metal wasn't any good before somebody even made a bearing out of it! As we know, no bearing, no party with that show!
                        Tom
                        MetroWest, Boston

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                        • #27
                          The coil is located on the nose by three "lands" and three "pins" The pins keep it from spinning and the snap ring has to cover all three lands to keep the coil tight against the compressor head. In my case, too small a snap ring had been used, being "stretched" over the shaft only covering 2 of the 3 lands and allowing the coil to mover around a bit on the head.
                          I got the truck back together and just need a hot day to really see if it is done, so far it looks to be. Can't even tell when the compressor kicks on, it is that smooth and quiet.
                          Big trucks can in some ways be hard on stuff, and in others easier. For one, once the A/C is turned on, it tends to stay on for most of the day, or even for over 24 hrs. There are no cut-outs for wide open throttle, and they tend not to use the OTCC system, Also the run in a very limited RPM range. Idle is around 650 RPM and max is 2100 RPM, but running down the road it is normally between 1600-1800 RPM. Makes it easy to select the proper pulley ratio. if the compressor doesn't have to run over a wide RPM range.
                          Also there is more room for the condenser, (most cases) and plenty of air flow. In some cases remote (Roof top) condensers are used, and you get good cool airflow that far above the road.
                          While the amount of hours used may be very high, most drivers will not put up with a malfunction system, so they get fixed before the system destroy themselves. They are also more likely to have more or better system safeties and less likely to be serviced by people who don't know what they are doing.
                          The high number of hours used may be why I don't look kindly on the small aluminum compressor so popular today. Most all my experience with them is in big trucks and I have found a higher than acceptable failure rate.
                          The hay-day for truck components was the '70's and 80's when you saw things designed and built to out-last the engine, or at least last until the engine had to be overhauled. Things like the Delco 25 SI brushless alternator would boast in their sales lit that it would outlast the engine. I have found this to be no idle boast, I run them, Same is true for the Ingersoll-Rand air starter.
                          Now trucks are becoming as cramped and as throw a way as cars under the hood. Components are crammed in and the under hood heat is much higher on the new stuff.
                          "
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by Cornbinder89; 3 weeks ago.

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                          • #28
                            Cool beans! Haven't had the fun on that one. Coils have been rare to me. Clutch gaps, bad bearings that somebody else said wasn't replaceable? Nothing to lose take it out and sure enough it has #s on it so do it! Those I call "peened" in may be the wrong term? It's like taking a punch and making a defect in a metal machined bore that holds those. Does make me nervous if any option NO only for taking out the old one. Hope you are warm enough to really test out yours not quite yet here but maybe by next week??
                            Tom
                            MetroWest, Boston

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