• Login or Register Here.
  • Login is located in the upper right corner of all pages.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

2005 Dodge 3500 AC issue

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 2005 Dodge 3500 AC issue

    Bought a truck that AC was not working, was told I just needed to install the serpentine belt to hook up compressor and it would be good to go. Surprise surprise, that is not the case. Been chasing the issue for a few days and hoping you guys can help.

    When I turn on my AC it runs right for about 30-45 seconds with gauges in the right ranges, blows cool air. Then you can watch the High Pressure gauge climb up to 300+ PSI. At this point the compressor kicks off and the Low Pressure gauge pegs out. Turn off AC for 2-3 minutes and then I can turn it on to start cycle over with a short period of cool air coming from vents.

    Originally thought there was a blockage in the liquid orifice tube but I swapped that out today and same issue.

    I have vacuumed system multiple times and recharged with correct amount of coolant and there is where I am at now.

    My next thought is to replace the condenser, but before i throw more money at this I am hoping someone can give me some guidance, I am a IT guy, just know enough to be dangerous with cars.

    Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    Welcome dodge2500: Looked for some info and would need exactly what this is to carry on much. What I found is condenser first asks to match it up at a counter could be many types used only guessing for now is a CCOT system and probably did have a catastrophic compressor failure prior to you getting it is why you saw what you saw if from a debris field downstream causing blockage partly but enough so it works for a short while then defaults to shut down and should. Range of pressures that is normal isn't so fast and easy. Need all info at the time to know what normal is still isn't always enough.

    Here's the problem for you on many levels. New to A/C the web isn't enough there are tons of tools and experience needed or you start all over again new parts instantly fail again make this out of control frustrating and costly only to maybe DIY it. Condenser is just $125 or so and an "O" tube just $5 or so isn't a penny towards this fix could be a couple grand easy - we nor you know that yet at all?

    High pressure climbing fast could just be lack of fan(s) turning on and they should be now when you try I doubt you can do any harm now not already done by trying. If they don't the high side alone pressure over somewhere around 300 or more will shut down system and should.

    So far you need to notice all info all at once to know if that's just normal or another reason. Ambient temps while testing totally matter.

    Here's what I suggest so far for YOU new to this if you seriously want to take this on with least risk of just repeated failures and equipment expense.

    Let a certified tech at a shop diagnose this out stating just what it needs could cost about $100-150 or so. You want to know if it possible without enough history if it self destructed and how to get out of that really ONCE and be done with it. Get a quote to just let it be done and no longer your problem there's a super high chance you'll spend more than a good shop will charge for the whole fix.

    It's great and fun to fix your own anything for some most people want to save a buck with A/C they end up not!

    Need to know what system you have (CCOT or TXV type) and which engine two listed with a quick check could make this a different set up so lost for now for specifics,
    Tom
    MetroWest, Boston

    Comment

    Working...
    X