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Chevy truck K1500

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  • #16
    I hear you on costs. Insane here by the foot. Some time ago someone bought a parking space in "Boston Proper" is tiny for a world record price of about $550,000 bucks! It's also home to the most costly ONE mile of road in the world - google out the "Big Dig" if you are bored. Was also a world record for refrigeration use because they had to freeze the mud/ground to dig it and not be a collapse of everything around it already there.

    I'm inland of that whole mess if you ask me nothing to do with it.

    Where are you with this truck and job now? The killer point is when a compressor burns out is you really lost the system not just the part itself. It's just plain not cost friendly any which way you slice it. Wish you luck with getting it going and that it can last,

    Tom
    MetroWest, Boston

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    • #17
      I have completed this job and all is good so far. Everything new except evaporator core and I flushed it two times. Let the stuff that came out sit overnight and yes it did have black stuff in it. I just hope most of this is gone from the system. Pressures are good and 40 degree vent temps now. Compressor is nice and quite for now
      I am hoping anyway. Tom D

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      • #18
        Great. Just what I do for myself now all older vehicles than this and harsh Winters the norm. Even old stuff the A/C would kick on when you request defog/defrost even if quite cold out too cold to allow it to stay engaged does cut off but have been leaving LPCO switches unplugged off season can't tell if A/C really works anyway don't want it running may let it once in a while just to let oil move over "down" time for them. That way so far have saved the horrors of a sudden hot day after Winter and hear one like marbles are in them are killing themselves. So old now, 22 and 30 year olds still all original both leak thru shaft seals when super cold unseen without detection say below about 20F.

        Saves them so far. Eeek, means you need to be real good at tweaking charge back up they shut up again stay fine all season, one is never exposed now below 45F or so stored no less than that. Still R-12 so old never touched last a few years on one good tweaking if I hear it.

        Those just mine. Would do that for others I saw routinely probably NOT good for newer let them get some exercise over the OFF season both intended and the lie (IMO) their running dehumidifies the air for defrosting - not at super cold it doesn't so a lie. Engine heat if shut one off or just use and park for a while even super cold will allow compressor to click on even super cold I hear it! NO, I don't want it to then.

        This just all IMO but proof is the two main vehicles I've owned or known since new and many others like them lost to rust now just want to keep what I have and possibly just forget it if one did what yours did the heater box in one is plastic city I just know would just bust up if taken apart now don't want that fight nor parts headaches.

        Just think about that only thing if you do that is place connector to LPCO out of harm's way not just dangling is all I do so far so good. Others with your level of failure here wouldn't fix it at all it's just annoying for a month or two just put up with no A/C for that time - not everyone can - all understood. Carry on,
        Tom
        MetroWest, Boston

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        • #19
          A lot of the newer compressors use a contact type seal that rides on the shaft itself. It is less likely to leak in the short term, but wears the shaft and causes a leak in the long term. Earlier compressors use a face seal, where the part that touches the shaft rotates with the shaft, and the stationary part of the seal is O ringed to the compressor head. The seal is partly sealed by compressor oil between the two part of the seal. With this type seal, the wearing parts are always replace when the seal is changed.
          I know many say you should operate the compressor through out the winter months to keep the seal oiled, I have even seen it written in manuals, but my experience dis assembling compressors that have sat for months or even years, is the seal stays oiled, surface tension of the oil is enough to prevent it from "drying" out the seal.

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          • #20
            That's the real worry. Is any lube there for off season or long term plain storage? NO. Brand new vehicles that's a problem seals anywhere for assorted things never mind sealing a gas under pressure hard enough to seal a liquid same deal many made to leak just the smallest amount keep that from exactly "drying" out.

            Took me a while plain 100s of vehicles can't all be stored indoors in a controlled environment where did the refrigerant go come real warm weather again? Conclusion that I can't verify with other than basic reality is the seal and a shaft do NOT expand and contract at the same amount hence a leak while sitting still that leaves no evidence of oil, dye nor a sniffer for refrigerant when warm again. OMG then where. Nothing else leaks and same vehicle(s) didn't if not allowed to get sub zero find those almost empty without an apparent reason and same one another year stored above 32F just a rough mark not conclusive for exactness DID NOT leak down with no other changes!

            For an A/C compressor IMO it's doomed to fail over time with temp changes and any humidity that seal has to be able to seal pressure and vacuum so both ways is just a marvel they last an hour never mind many years. My head hurts just thinking about how they last at all!
            Tom
            MetroWest, Boston

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