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  • Custom AC Line question

    So I have seen people go to r134a compressors on these cars that I plan to do on my car. But I have a big header that wouldnt allow me to run the loop the hose that connects to the top of the condenser. So my question is would I run into any problems to make it shorter and not run the loop directly to the compressor?

  • #2
    I'm not sure what your asking, I see some is in blue and some not, Why are you changing hoses or compressors? As long as you drain the oil out and replace with PAG or Ester, the compressor doesn't care what refrigerant is used, only that the oil be compatible with the refrigerant.
    The loop may be to shed more heat before the condenser, I wouldn't want to reduce that if possible.

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    • #3
      Just what is the project here? Converting/retrofitting a car/truck or custom something from R-12 perhaps? Is/was mineral oil in some parts now. OE or old type condenser being used? Needs more into. If changing oils now antique side of vehicles suggest Ester oil makes it easier. Compressors don't care as already said,
      Tom
      MetroWest, Boston

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      • #4
        I chose a bad picture and bad explanation sorry guys! So that's the stock system in my car. I have swapped the engine and getting rid of the old r12 compressor while doing that I need to get custom lines. So basically the red it the way it is currently routed but it won't work because of the header on my car it's very close to the radiator and the hose will not fit. But I wanted to just not run the loop and get a house like the yellow one with a shorter line.


        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          Here is a better pic for reference the red is the current line and the yellow is the way I plan to route the line.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Cornbinder already said and I'll say it again that 134a or R-12 for a new compressor wouldn't matter. Think hard if a real neat car and want this as excellent with A/C as possible for NBD really is USE R-12? It's around just go hunting and choose new if you can. If you must or want to for fast availability do know the rubber parts have to be for 134a - that's different. "o" rings, hose used is now barrier type new could leak if OEM hose was used. Smaller molecule for 134a.

            By it's nature it's INFERIOR only 80% as much for "Caloric" value of 12. So to compensate you use less if a known in this case have to be really good at tweaking a system just right and write down somewhere what was the magic amount.

            The newer condenser if you don't re-use the old one will be much more efficient but more delicate if an OE is still perfect. Those you can flush the newer you can't. Know what you lose by the switch and how to compensate or it will be fine if not super fussy.

            Hose lengths? IDK - They've put evaporators in the rear of large vehicles for ages and they work fine OR the generation of VW bug + bus (rear air cooled engine ones) compressor out back lines all the to front under them. Those and Corvettes with hose so close to almost glowing manifold of engine OE metal line did suck up heat. Worked just none of those were wonderful.

            I can't see how the bus especially could cool worth a damn if full of passengers and they made them to? Windows all opened though.

            The short answer is by rights it should work so if not happy it's the change to 134a wrecked it most not just IMO it's just inferior to compare.

            One last note: Way back now the "Grand-Daddy" of this spot now several folks well versed used the 134a parts thinking great will be better to swap back (illegal if anyone cares) and did NOT improve the performance. Worth knowing so you don't waste your time on that.

            So far I say go for it with your plans,
            Tom
            MetroWest, Boston

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            • #7
              Awesome thanks ill go for it! As for the condenser I am replacing it has a serpentine one currently I bought a parallel flow one to replace it. As for replacing the compressor I currently have is notorious for leaking all the time since I want to convert I assumed might as well get a more reliable compressor

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cornbinder89 View Post
                I'm not sure what your asking, I see some is in blue and some not, Why are you changing hoses or compressors? As long as you drain the oil out and replace with PAG or Ester, the compressor doesn't care what refrigerant is used, only that the oil be compatible with the refrigerant.
                The loop may be to shed more heat before the condenser, I wouldn't want to reduce that if possible.
                It wouldn't do much as to shed heat as it runs by the header since the engine I swapped has now pushed the header very close to the radiator that it gets squeezed between the header and radiator. The header has actually burned a hole thru the hose leaking the r12 it had

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                • #9
                  Well, your on your own. You have changed the engine, compressor and exhaust mounting. The OEM set up might have been done to shed heat, or to absorb vibration so the OEM pipe doesn't crack over time. With all the changes, it is hard to say what will work and last and what will not.
                  The engine has to move around, and you need clearance from hot exhaust, you need to allow for belt tensioning if the compressor is on a swing mount.
                  If the engine is crammed in as tight as you seam to say, I think your going to have several problems. You might even set it alight, if the header is too near something that can burn.
                  You don't have a "system problem" you have an engineering problem. It is one reason I hate engine swaps, Esp those done by "come here and hold this while I weld it" engineers. Not saying that is you, but have seen more then my share of them.
                  Vibration is an insidious foe, solve a problem in one place and it rears its ugly head somewhere else.
                  Good luck to you.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cornbinder89 View Post
                    Well, your on your own. You have changed the engine, compressor and exhaust mounting. The OEM set up might have been done to shed heat, or to absorb vibration so the OEM pipe doesn't crack over time. With all the changes, it is hard to say what will work and last and what will not.
                    The engine has to move around, and you need clearance from hot exhaust, you need to allow for belt tensioning if the compressor is on a swing mount.
                    If the engine is crammed in as tight as you seam to say, I think your going to have several problems. You might even set it alight, if the header is too near something that can burn.
                    You don't have a "system problem" you have an engineering problem. It is one reason I hate engine swaps, Esp those done by "come here and hold this while I weld it" engineers. Not saying that is you, but have seen more then my share of them.
                    Vibration is an insidious foe, solve a problem in one place and it rears its ugly head somewhere else.
                    Good luck to you.
                    No the problem is the header I’m running I chose it to squeeze more power out of the engine. As for the swap it’s a drop in swap it’s an old 91 Honda Civic they make mounts for them to swap almost any Honda engine in it. The only clearance issue I have is that long hose and the header beside that I have no problem putting tension on the belt. As for the swap I didn’t cheap out with anything because I wanted to avoid major problems, although does come up lol. I'll see if I can keep the loop somehow

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                    • #11
                      Oh my! A '91 Civic and you wanted more power? To each their own. I'm with Cornbinder that you're on your own and wish you luck. Swapping engines isn't my game never was. If anything this is WAY too new to play around or just have an illegal car is fine if that's what you want.

                      Quote from an above post ">The header has actually burned a hole thru the hose leaking the r12 it had <" We may not know for sure if burned thru, rubbed - I sure don't. I do know wild engineering designing work goes into control of vibrations on about everything in a vehicle. A 2010 recently noticed that is used two flex exhaust pipes or maybe an alteration is new to owner just noticed that.

                      Engine is sideways in all these was never such a great idea but had to make room or an interior or engine in proper direction would take up any room to be inside the thing. It means exhaust with engine flex want to whip up and down on mounts so would if fixed be wild motion at the tip of a tail-pipe. Think about that.

                      It's done everywhere now except the oldest of FWD designs that would never do that still out there new now VW, Subaru to name two.

                      Early compressor failures of OE? Of course things are so jammed in there's no place for heat to flow not much is going to like that and doesn't.

                      Yes that "loops" are made in things all over vehicles of line, hose both for vibrations and a list of reasons many huge carmakers still make mistakes this is no exception.

                      It's your venture have fun and hope it makes you happy and actually works out never mind A/C and doesn't just be a dangerous altered vehicle do keep in mind it uses fuel and lines for that is FAR more important than this stuff,




                      Tom
                      MetroWest, Boston

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                      • #12
                        As far as fuel lines I'm using the oe stuff

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