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  • VW compressor fitting?

    Hello all I am looking for a VW 1.8t AC compressor fitting. Its off a 2004 passat. I needed to make lines from the VW to 2001 dodge dakota. swap info can be found here. http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=465373
    As you can see the suction side is an oddball large fitting. I tried to have a local shop cut and braze or weld the line so it could be swedged but the VW pipe is a strange alloy with a very high melt point. Any help would be appreciated.


  • #2
    Welcome. Link to VW site didn't show for me no surprise. If you have the line that will work then the right place with correct tools to put that end on shouldn't have a problem. I can't speak for high end welding of alloys (heliarching I call it {sp?}) but should rule out any 'brazing" meaning with brass.

    If you are determined to have a hose made up to adapt to this job 1 is to find the right shop and have the parts. The tools for a good splice in a rubber section I'd rather see if at all possible not try to fit just the end on.

    Have to ask why go to this instead of what would just fit in the first place?

    Tom

    Tom
    MetroWest, Boston

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    • #3
      I found a fitting here at the shop that's made out of steel that might work. Could you give us a measurement near the oring area. I'll try to get a picture posted of what I have

      Attached Files

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      • #4
        on the original VW line, how long is hard line before it changes to hose? What is the OD? My thought is to cut the line long and flare or double flare and using a union to beadlock hose fitting. I know you present line is cut short, but a replacement OEM shouldn't be too expensive if the solution will work.
        I could see where Heli-arc wouldn't work if you don't know the alloy, you would need a filler metal that would mix/adhere to both the VW part and the weld on hose end.
        If all else fails, take the stub end to a good machinist and have him make you one in steel, then silver solder or braze a steel hose fitting to it. I suppose he could duplicate it in aluminum as well, but steel is easy to weld/braze with common equipment, aluminum is more tricky.
        It is do-able, you just may not be able to buy off the shelf a way to get what you want.
        I have had to use the services of a good machinist a few times, the trick is to design what you want so you can repair yourself in the future if you have a hose failure. With steel you could heat and "un braze" the hose fitting and replace with another with just torches, the steel should last the life of the car, aluminum, might not.

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        • #5
          Just search TDI dakota if the link is not working. No shop around here can weld it and these are good shops. The hard section in its original form hugs the compressor so tight a compression fitting cannot fit hence the cut and twist.


          Here are a few pics. Please excuse the tape measure but as you can see this fitting is huge.





          Having a fitting made might be the trick as I really would like to avoid fabricating a bracket for a compressor I dont have. But if the cost is crazy then I may be forced to do that.

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          • #6
            What I was wondering was, before you cut the line to try and splice, was there enough solid line to flare? If so, than buy a new OEM line and cut further out and flare. Looks to be 3/4"/19mm line so could be flared to 3/4" fitting.
            Another thought, if the base of the fitting is thick enough, could you drill out the tube and tap for a hyd type O ring fitting? I think it would be hard to make an A/C insert O ring fitting, but the Hyd type use a straight thread with a bevel at the top to hold and O ring, the problem would be the fitting would be large, for a 3/4, 19mm line The end of the fitting that the hose connects to would be JIC flare, but at the pressures we are talking, you could get way with an SAE flare fitting on the JIC flare. The main difference is the angle of the flare, JIC is 37 deg vs 45 deg for SAE.
            I am beginning to think having a fitting made will be you best option, followed by a replacement compressor. It will come down to what skills you have and what you will have to pay to have made.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cornbinder89 View Post
              What I was wondering was, before you cut the line to try and splice, was there enough solid line to flare? If so, than buy a new OEM line and cut further out and flare. Looks to be 3/4"/19mm line so could be flared to 3/4" fitting.
              Another thought, if the base of the fitting is thick enough, could you drill out the tube and tap for a hyd type O ring fitting? I think it would be hard to make an A/C insert O ring fitting, but the Hyd type use a straight thread with a bevel at the top to hold and O ring, the problem would be the fitting would be large, for a 3/4, 19mm line The end of the fitting that the hose connects to would be JIC flare, but at the pressures we are talking, you could get way with an SAE flare fitting on the JIC flare. The main difference is the angle of the flare, JIC is 37 deg vs 45 deg for SAE.
              I am beginning to think having a fitting made will be you best option, followed by a replacement compressor. It will come down to what skills you have and what you will have to pay to have made.
              There was zero room to leave the line the way it was. A cut had to be made. I have made some calls to a few smaller CNC fab shops in the area as the larger ones wont touch it. Hopefully I can get one of them to make me a fitting.

              My other possible issue is this compressor is a variable displacement one and the dodge system was a constant. I am hoping I can get away with running it.

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              • #8
                Any decent guy with a hunk of metal and a good lathe can make a fitting, doesn't have to be CNC made. Most CNC shy away from small jobs because the programing takes more time than the cutting that they charge for.
                I have a local shop that makes stuff for me all the time, he has a few lathes and a mill, but a lathe would do it all for a simple fitting. I don't know where you are, but ask around at welding/fab shops for someone who can spin one up on a simple old lathe.

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